to celebrate its 25th anniversary, Sónar is broadcasting two signals towards GJ273b, a potentially habitable exoplanet located 12.4 light years from Earth in the constellation of Canis Minor. working with the Catalonia Institute of Space Studies and METI International (Messaging Extra-terrestrial Intelligence), the project involves 33 artists linked to the festival, including Laurent Garnier, The Black Madonna, Kode 9 and Daito Manabe

the first transmission was sent in October from the parabolic steerable antenna pictured, located at the EISCAT facility in Ramfjordmoen, near Tromsø, Norway. the second will be beamed out into deep space this April, and your music could be part of it – just submit an original composition in any genre or musical style before 1 March 2018. three pieces chosen by the judging panel will be included in the broadcast and you’ll also win a pair of VIP passes to attend Sónar in Barcelona in June, which follows the festival’s second event in Hong Kong this March

read more

pop culture pulsar


fifty years ago today, astronomers working at the Mullard Radio Astronomy Observatory in Cambridge discovered an unusual signal coming from deep space: a steady, rhythmic pulse unlike anything seen before. the radio signal, which repeated every 1.33 seconds, seemly oddly unnatural and was soon nicknamed LGM-1 for “Little Green Men” by its discoverers, Jocelyn Bell Burnell and Antony Hewish, who briefly considered but then ruled out the possibility it had originated from some far-off extraterrestrial civilisation

read more

all that glitters


from the ancient Aztecs to Versace’s new Spring 2018 collection, gold has transcended fashion and culture to remain relevant across millennia. it’s one of humanity’s most enduring precious metals, but it’s taken science until this week to finally pin down exactly where it comes from

the short answer is that gold and other heavy elements are formed by the explosions created by merging neutron stars – super dense suns that weigh twice as much as ours but are only about 10km across. the long version of how we figured this out is an amazing story of cutting-edge physics, astronomy and some timely international cooperation.

read more in our new post for AnOther

space age


following on from two successful gallery exhibitions, the Vintage NASA Photographs project has just released a new set of photographs for sale, including this one of the Gemini-7 spacecraft as seen from Gemini-6. other highlights of the collection include orbital tests high above the Earth, various Apollo astronauts on the Moon and even some shots from the Voyager probes taken in the 70s and 80s

read more

deep space


deep down in the depths of the Earth’s oceans lies a world in many ways more mysterious than outer space. blanketed by darkness and the crushing weight of billions of tons of seawater, this alien abyss is the focus of the Parley Deep Space Program, which we recently profiled for a special insert inside Dazed Magazine…

read more

join us

click here to be the first to hear about new field trips and expeditions

magic mushrooms


the complex and mutually-enriching interaction between soil, plants and fungi is similar to the fertile relationship between mushrooms, mankind and art – a dynamic explored in a new show curated by Francesca Gavin that opens tomorrow night in Paris. as she explains, “this simplest of organism has been at the core of ritual, power and ideas around immortality and strength for thousands of years. contemporary artists are continually drawn towards the mushroom for its references to nature, the psychedelic and the spiritual”

read more



a beautiful magazine exploring all things botanical, THE PLANT is ‘a curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery’ put together by and featuring creative people who love plants

Issue 9’s cover and monograph is dedicated to the humble yet irresistible geranium, with illustrations by Mélanie Dautreppe-Liermann, Ken Kagami, Jean Jullien, Mrzyk & Moriceau, Tim Lahan and Okamura Yuta. elsewhere in the issue, Brazilian artist Roberto Burle Marx talks gardens, designer Antoni Arola details his passion for seeds and seed pods, photographer Mark Borthwick explores the flora of Jamaica and super/collider provides text to accompany Kuba Ryniewicz’s incredible photos of the Danakil Depression – an arid, alien landscape in the Afar region of northern Ethiopia

Issue 9 / £12

read more

deep impact

Meteor Crater by Joe King

in the first in a series of articles, we explore some of the places we’ll be visiting on our upcoming Total Solar Eclipse Expedition this August. first up is Meteor Crater, a massive hole in the ground in Arizona that helped scientists establish techniques for identifying meteor strikes…

read more

a planet of oceans


from the depths of the Marianas Trench to the remote beaches of the Chagos Archipelago, we’ve rounded up five incredible places from around the planet in honour of World Oceans Day

read more

L’Indifférence Des Etoiles

L'Indifférence Des Etoiles

88 pages / 26 × 19 cm / hardback
41 photographs / full colour offset
first edition of 500

L’Indifférence Des Etoiles (The Indifference of the Stars) is French photographer Julien Mauve’s first book. filled with juxtaposed images of deep space and our world, it is about the quest for meaning and the difficulty to live with the knowledge that we exist. somehow, the stars become a shelter for the mind and help us bear the briefness of human life

add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

read more

the cosmic desert


stretching more than 7000 square kilometres across the barren deserts of Western Tunisia, Chott el Djerid is a vast salt lake that extends to the stars. an ‘endorheic’ basin, it floods in winter with rainwater and run-off from the distant Atlas Mountains, with dissolved minerals forming delicate pinks, soft greens, baby blues and other subtly beautiful colours. as spring turns to summer, crystalline structures emerge as the fierce Saharan heat turns the shallow waterways into glittering desert once more…

read more about Chott el Djerid’s cosmic connections in our latest Where On Earth column for AnOther

‘ten’ Hong Kong launch party


Thursday 6 April 2017

ten years ago we published our first zine and began a journey into science and culture. since then we’ve taken creative types to Iceland and Tenerife in search of natural and scientific wonders, watched the Transit of Venus in Sweden, educated people about green energy over frozen margaritas in a former petrol station, visited CERN in Switzerland and Super K in Japan, held a conference about greening space exploration, explored the history of alcohol in space in Mexico City, published a book about crystals, camped in a concrete utopia in the Arizona desert and partied on an environmental research ship

plus a bunch of other stuff

join us to celebrate the Hong Kong launch of our retrospective book and the start of our two week art/science pop-up shop at Book B, an independent bookstore in Sham Shui Po

Book B @ 
common room & co.

198 Tai Nan Street, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong
opening reception Thursday | April 6 | 6-8pm
open daily 11am – 7pm

read more

art and sci-fi in the Atacama


in one of the highest, driest and most remote landscapes on the planet, astronomers have constructed a series of megalithic devices to peer deep into space. these complex, futuristic artefacts and the strange landscape that surrounds them are what drew French artist Caroline Corbasson to the Atacama, where she’s currently shooting a new short film. you can read more about the project in our latest article for Amuse and check out this series of exclusive location scouting photos…

read more

the in sound from way out

GOES satellite

researchers at Queen Mary University in London are inviting filmmakers and creatives to experiment with sounds from space, as part of a new competition launched today. to find out more about these cosmic noises, we caught up with project lead Dr Martin Archer…

read more

islands of ice


in our latest column for AnOther we overfly the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is about to unleash one of the largest icebergs the Earth has ever seen

ten for friends

between printing and postage, we can’t afford to send out free copies of our chunky retrospective book, ten

instead, we invite you to download a free high resolution PDF (130MB) of the entire book, or use this secret link (shhh) to order a discounted copy for just £5 which helps to cover costs

either way, we hope you enjoy all 104 pages of the stunning science we’ve had the privilege to cover, curate and create over the last decade

♡ s/c



unearthing and meticulously photographing artwork and images from 19th and early 20th century astronomy books, Print Science are working to showcase how people used to record the heavens. beyond lunar charts, hand sketches of the solar corona and an early photograph of the Pleiades, the collection includes early impressions of Mars and a beautiful drawing of a comet over London

read more

ring world


open up Google Maps and scroll over to Canada – then zoom in and take a look to the right of the ‘Québec’ label. notice something weird? a massive, circular lake? that’s an impact crater from a 5km wide comet or asteroid that hit the area over 200 million years ago, making it the oldest known and largest visible impact crater on Earth

in our new column for AnOther, we look at Manicouagan Crater and other (potentially related) impact sites across the planet

Chris Hatherill


Chris Hatherill is a freelance journalist and editor who, having started his career working for the likes of Vice and Sleazenation, set up super/collider in 2006 to explore science from a pop cultural perspective. he currently heads up super/collider’s worldwide expeditions and is also Contributing Editor at Parley For The Oceans

all posts by Chris