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L’Indifférence Des Etoiles

L'Indifférence Des Etoiles

88 pages / 26 × 19 cm / hardback
41 photographs / full colour offset
first edition of 500

L’Indifférence Des Etoiles (The Indifference of the Stars) is French photographer Julien Mauve’s first book. filled with juxtaposed images of deep space and our world, it is about the quest for meaning and the difficulty to live with the knowledge that we exist. somehow, the stars become a shelter for the mind and help us bear the briefness of human life

£25
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the cosmic desert

largest-salt-pan-in-sahara-chott-el-djerid-tunisia

stretching more than 7000 square kilometres across the barren deserts of Western Tunisia, Chott el Djerid is a vast salt lake that extends to the stars. an ‘endorheic’ basin, it floods in winter with rainwater and run-off from the distant Atlas Mountains, with dissolved minerals forming delicate pinks, soft greens, baby blues and other subtly beautiful colours. as spring turns to summer, crystalline structures emerge as the fierce Saharan heat turns the shallow waterways into glittering desert once more…

read more about Chott el Djerid’s cosmic connections in our latest Where On Earth column for AnOther


‘ten’ Hong Kong launch party

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Thursday 6 April 2017

ten years ago we published our first zine and began a journey into science and culture. since then we’ve taken creative types to Iceland and Tenerife in search of natural and scientific wonders, watched the Transit of Venus in Sweden, educated people about green energy over frozen margaritas in a former petrol station, visited CERN in Switzerland and Super K in Japan, held a conference about greening space exploration, explored the history of alcohol in space in Mexico City, published a book about crystals, camped in a concrete utopia in the Arizona desert and partied on an environmental research ship

plus a bunch of other stuff

join us to celebrate the Hong Kong launch of our retrospective book and the start of our two week art/science pop-up shop at Book B, an independent bookstore in Sham Shui Po

Book B @ 
common room & co.

198 Tai Nan Street, Sham Shui Po, Hong Kong
opening reception Thursday | April 6 | 6-8pm
open daily 11am – 7pm

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SUPER/COLLIDER X BOOK B

R0004008 copy

6-20 April 2017

in tandem with the Hong Kong launch of our retrospective book, super/collider is pleased to present a two week pop-up shop at Book B, located inside the new mixed use space common room & co. in Hong Kong

join us on Thursday 6 April to pick up a free copy of ten (while stocks last) and browse a selection of publications at the intersection of art and science…

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Planetoid Life by Seana Gavin

PlanetoidLife

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

£50
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Time Traveller by Seana Gavin

TimeTraveller

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

full series here

£50
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Liberty Sunset by Seana Gavin

LibertySunset

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

£50
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add to cart (elsewhere)

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art and sci-fi in the Atacama

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in one of the highest, driest and most remote landscapes on the planet, astronomers have constructed a series of megalithic devices to peer deep into space. these complex, futuristic artefacts and the strange landscape that surrounds them are what drew French artist Caroline Corbasson to the Atacama, where she’s currently shooting a new short film. you can read more about the project in our latest article for Amuse and check out our Instagram for a series of exclusive location scouting photos like this one

 


the in sound from way out

GOES satellite

researchers at Queen Mary University in London are inviting filmmakers and creatives to experiment with sounds from space, as part of a new competition launched today. to find out more about these cosmic noises, we caught up with project lead Dr Martin Archer…

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islands of ice

antarctic_peninsula_the_larsen_ice_shelf_and_the_sea_ice_covered_waters_around_the_region

in our latest column for AnOther we overfly the Larsen C Ice Shelf in Antarctica, which is about to unleash one of the largest icebergs the Earth has ever seen


THE PLANT

issue9-mark-2


a beautiful magazine exploring all things botanical, THE PLANT is ‘a curious observer of ordinary plants and other greenery’ put together by and featuring creative people who love plants

Issue 9’s cover and monograph is dedicated to the humble yet irresistible geranium, with illustrations by Mélanie Dautreppe-Liermann, Ken Kagami, Jean Jullien, Mrzyk & Moriceau, Tim Lahan and Okamura Yuta. elsewhere in the issue, Brazilian artist Roberto Burle Marx talks gardens, designer Antoni Arola details his passion for seeds and seed pods, photographer Mark Borthwick explores the flora of Jamaica and super/collider provides text to accompany Kuba Ryniewicz’s incredible photos of the Danakil Depression – an arid, alien landscape in the Afar region of northern Ethiopia

Issue 9 / £12
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annual subscription / £24
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ten for friends

between printing and postage, we can’t afford to send out free copies of our chunky retrospective book, ten

instead, we invite you to download a free high resolution PDF (130MB) of the entire book, or use this secret link (shhh) to order a discounted copy for just £5 which helps to cover costs

either way, we hope you enjoy all 104 pages of the stunning science we’ve had the privilege to cover, curate and create over the last decade

♡ s/c


treasures

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unearthing and meticulously photographing artwork and images from 19th and early 20th century astronomy books, Print Science are working to showcase how people used to record the heavens. beyond lunar charts, hand sketches of the solar corona and an early photograph of the Pleiades, the collection includes early impressions of Mars and a beautiful drawing of a comet over London

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ring world

manicouagan_crater_iss012e15880

open up Google Maps and scroll over to Canada – then zoom in and take a look to the right of the ‘Québec’ label. notice something weird? a massive, circular lake? that’s an impact crater from a 5km wide comet or asteroid that hit the area over 200 million years ago, making it the oldest known and largest visible impact crater on Earth

in our new column for AnOther, we look at Manicouagan Crater and other (potentially related) impact sites across the planet


Chris Hatherill

super/collider founder Chris Hatherill

Chris Hatherill is a freelance journalist and editor who, having started his career working for the likes of Vice and Sleazenation, set up super/collider in 2006 to explore science from a pop cultural perspective. he doesn’t do a whole lot else

all posts by Chris

chrishatherill.wordpress.com
@super_collider
_super_collider


speaking into space

deep_field

20 October 2016

humanity regularly sends information from Earth out into the universe that may be picked up by potential extraterrestrial intelligence – but should we be sending such messages? and if so, how do we represent ourselves? in searching the universe, what do we find out about ourselves?

join us as we explore these ideas with Dr Jill Stuart – an academic based at the London School of Economics who specialises in the politics, ethics and law of outer space exploration and exploitation. beyond serving as Editor-in-Chief of the journal Space Policy, Dr. Stuart is a trustee of METI International, an organisation that focuses on sending messages from Earth to potential extraterrestrial life

7.30-9.30pm
Second Home
68 Hanbury Street / London / E1 5JL
tickets are free for Second Home Members and £3 for non-members – please RSVP here


London launch party

montage

Tuesday 13 September 2016

ten years ago we published our first zine and began a journey into science and culture. since then we’ve taken creative types to Iceland and Tenerife in search of natural and scientific wonders, watched the Transit of Venus in Sweden, visited CERN in Switzerland and Super K in Japan, held a conference about greening space exploration, explored the history of space booze in Mexico, published a book about crystals, camped in a concrete utopia in the Arizona desert and partied on an environmental research ship

plus a bunch of other stuff

join us next month to celebrate a decade of discerning science with the launch of a retrospective book, ten

Ace Hotel London
100 Shoreditch High Street | E1 6JQ
7-11pm | music from BEAT Magazine’s Hanna Hanra


heads up

Perseids

the annual Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend, and this year could see more shooting stars in the sky than usual. we asked Royal Observatory Greenwich astronomer Marek Kukula for the low down

“like the weather, all meteor showers are a bit unpredictable by nature,” he told us, “but the annual Perseid Shower in August is normally one of the most reliable in terms of putting on a good show. it’s caused by a stream of dust particles left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle that the Earth ploughs through every August, causing them to burn up high in the atmosphere. normally we just clip the edge of the dust stream but this year we should pass through a denser section – leading to predictions of a more spectacular display than usual. as always, predictions like this need to be taken with a pinch of salt. for a start, the Moon will be up in the evenings this week and its light tends to drown out the fainter meteors. but, even so, if you look up for 15 or 20 minutes on the nights around August 12th you should have a good chance of seeing some bright meteors streaking across the sky – always an amazing sight”


making plastic precious

Studio Swine

inspired by nautical craftsmanship and folk art, the designers at Studio Swine went in search of plastic in the ocean for their Gyrecraft project – and found a lot to choose from. sailing 1000 nautical miles from the Azores to the Canary Islands, they passed through through the North Atlantic Gyre: one of five points on the planet where swirling megacurrents concentrate vast quantities of floating debris, including plastic

“it’s one of the biggest problems facing our civilisation,” says Studio Swine’s Alex Groves, “plastic is in every part of the ocean and the effect it’s having on plankton is only just beginning to be investigated. plankton are the base of the entire planet’s food chain, and they are responsible for producing one third of the oxygen we breath. if we lose plankton we are headed for another mass extinction. in the swirling gyre, most of the plastics have broken down into tiny fragments which are spread over massive stretches of the ocean. due to their size, they are incredibly difficult to recover in any large quantity – making this once disposable material very precious”

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saved 🌴

Corinne Staley

good news on the rainforest front this month, with the Democratic Republic of Congo declaring a vast new national park covering 2.2 million acres of virtually pristine forest that’s home to Bonobos, Okapis, Forest Elephants, Congo Peacocks and a newly discovered monkey, the Lesula

now, alongside the new Lomami National Park, the Rainforest Trust and local partner the Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation are looking to safeguard another 1.1 million acres next door by establishing the Balanga Forest Reserve. together, this will form a massive joined up area to help stabilise the region for people and wildlife, safeguard the forest and promote sustainable livelihoods

super/collider firmly believes that protecting pristine rainforests like those found in the Congo is one of the most effective strategies for protecting biodiversity and mitigating climate change. we will be making a donation and invite you to join us – with an anonymous benefactor matching donations, your donation of just £15 can save 50 acres!

donate now


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