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seeing science

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launched in September last year, Seeing Science is a year-long project at the University of Maryland that examines and documents the ways in which science is represented through the visual medium of photography

with online platforms, essays, events and exhibitions, the project looks at the ways in which science is represented as an industry and as an academic subject; the people involved and its myriad interactions with our everyday life. from Eadweard Muybridge’s pioneering studies of animal locomotion to NASA’s rich photography archive through to augmented reality goggles for surgeons, Seeing Science seeks to examine the various forms scientific images take, what they reveal and how they transform the disciplines they serve. Bobby Jewell spoke with the project’s curator and producer, Marvin Hieferman, to find out more

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art and sci-fi in the Atacama

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in one of the highest, driest and most remote landscapes on the planet, astronomers have constructed a series of megalithic devices to peer deep into space. these complex, futuristic artefacts and the strange landscape that surrounds them are what drew French artist Caroline Corbasson to the Atacama, where she’s currently shooting a new short film. you can read more about the project in our latest article for Amuse and check out this series of exclusive location scouting photos…

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ten

104-page retrospective book (2006-2016)
first edition of 1000
170mm x 240mm
printed with vegetable-based inks on FSC-certified paper made from 100% post-consumer waste

in 2006 we published our first fanzine and began a journey into science and culture. from the depths of interstellar space to the limitless subatomic horizons of particle physics to the most beautiful places on our planet, we’ve been privileged to spend the past decade exploring the wonders and aesthetics of science from a creative standpoint

full of short stories and facts, ten is more than just a retrospective of our work. it’s a visual record of where science has taken us all in the last decade – told through 100 beautiful images from the worlds of astronomy, chemistry, mineralogy, physics, ecology, biology… and beyond

£10
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

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the in sound from way out

GOES satellite

researchers at Queen Mary University in London are inviting filmmakers and creatives to experiment with sounds from space, as part of a new competition launched today. to find out more about these cosmic noises, we caught up with project lead Dr Martin Archer…

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making plastic precious

Studio Swine

inspired by nautical craftsmanship and folk art, the designers at Studio Swine went in search of plastic in the ocean for their Gyrecraft project – and found a lot to choose from. sailing 1000 nautical miles from the Azores to the Canary Islands, they passed through through the North Atlantic Gyre: one of five points on the planet where swirling megacurrents concentrate vast quantities of floating debris, including plastic

“it’s one of the biggest problems facing our civilisation,” says Studio Swine’s Alex Groves, “plastic is in every part of the ocean and the effect it’s having on plankton is only just beginning to be investigated. plankton are the base of the entire planet’s food chain, and they are responsible for producing one third of the oxygen we breath. if we lose plankton we are headed for another mass extinction. in the swirling gyre, most of the plastics have broken down into tiny fragments which are spread over massive stretches of the ocean. due to their size, they are incredibly difficult to recover in any large quantity – making this once disposable material very precious”

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2016 Icelandic expedition

photo by Tom Sewell

7-12 September 2016

as late summer lingers over the North Atlantic, join a small group of like-minded creative explorers as we travel across, around and underneath Iceland in search of the Northern Lights and other natural wonders in our most ambitious Icelandic adventure to date

amid the stark beauty of the country’s surreal landscapes, we’ll spend the dark nights watching for the Aurora Borealis and the days exploring the country’s geological, volcanic and natural diversity. we’ll hike to towering glaciers, visit slumbering volcanoes, watch erupting geysers, relax in natural hot springs, venture behind tumbling waterfalls and descend under the surface of Iceland’s constantly shifting topography

join the waiting list

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the plant whisperer

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Wednesday 4 May 2016

join super/collider at Second Home to gain an insight into artist Kasia Molga‘s practice, which encourages plants to draw. as part of the World Wilder Lab project, Kasia and her colleagues have been interacting with plants using hacking techniques. the multi-media artist describes herself as an environmentalist, hactivist and designer concerned with changes in our relationship with ecology in an increasingly technologically mediated world

7.30-9.30pm
Second Home
68 Hanbury Street / London / E1 5JL
£5 / book now

 


profile: Lightning and Kinglyface

Lightning + Kinglyface


Lightning and Kinglyface are Anna Fulmine and Victoria Shahrokh, a team of designers whose work mixes the subtleties of design with scientific principles to create lush, dense and vivid objects, sets and exhibitions. based in Dalston, their work involves collaborations with photographers Thomas Brown and Ryan Hopkinson as well work with clients ranging from Bompas & Parr to Zaha Hadid. our new contributor Bobby Jewell spoke to them to find out more

so what are your backgrounds and why did you decide to work together?
we both met during our time at university in Epsom at the Surrey Institute of Art and Design. we were studying graphic design and were becoming increasingly dissatisfied by the work that we were producing. so in a bid to create larger work that was straddling the worlds of art and design we began to look into theatre and set design. at the core of our partnership was this need to make three dimensional, creatively-inspiring, sculptural work. working as a duo helps in this sense because we are both constantly challenging one another and bringing new references to the pot. also it motivates both of us to have another person to answer to and discuss ideas with

your designs often influenced by science, what is it about these principles or ideas that inspire you?
there is something about the rigidity of science that guides our creative minds; theories that are set in stone that cannot be argued with, or tampered with. we like the continuity of science, the permanence of it for explaining our intriguing planet and perhaps some of our more philosophical and fantastical ideas. scientific ideas have visually been quite poorly represented for some time, which upsets us because the principles of science are so visual and so exciting and the overly intellectual world of science should be opened up to creative minds

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waves ⚫️⚫️〰〰〰〰〰

LIGO

researchers working on the LIGO experiment in America are due to make a historic announcement at 15:30 GMT today that we expect will be confirmation they’ve detected gravitational waves

operating since 2002 but recently upgraded, the facility consists of two separate L-Shaped laser observatories which measure the ultra-tiny distortions caused by passing gravitational waves. we should be able to detect these ‘ripples in space time’ when they emanate from massive objects like orbiting neutron stars and black holes, but they’ve never been seen before now. if LIGO has detected them, it would mark the first direct observation of a phenomenon first posited by Einstein exactly 100 years ago, opening up a new chapter in physics and a whole new way of observing the universe

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flightsuit

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with Virgin Galactic and Y-3 collaborating on a new range of flightsuits and apparel, we take a closer look at the high-tech material inside…

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ice on Mars

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following the recent confirmation that liquid water flows intermittently on present-day Mars, we caught up with the winners of NASA’s 3D Printed Habitat challenge to find out more about their ingenious design – which uses ice mined from below the surface to shield explorers from radiation while providing expansive views out over the Martian landscape and a unique ‘garden’ space

read our full interview for Uncube


gallery: NASA’s forgotten Space Shuttle

long before America’s high-tech space shuttles were lofting astronauts and cargo into orbit and gliding back to Earth, a decidedly more basic version was forging a lonely path to space. lovingly handcrafted by engineers from NASA Test Shop 4650, this often overlooked piece of space history was cobbled together from steel beams, spare engine mounts, wood and aluminium. hand painted in a sparse all-white livery, OV-098 (as it was designated) was like a real-life Playmobil playset

read the full story in our first feature for It’s Nice That or check out this beautiful ‘spacecraft’ in photos below

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review: Voyager – The Grand Tour

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Martin Eberle’s Voyager – The Grand Tour, published in an edition of just 300 by Berlin-based Drittel Books, is, as the press release humbly states ‘a new publication about the NASA Voyager mission’. comprising three cloth-bound volumes within a slipcase bearing a silhouette of the mission’s famous Golden Record, it seems more fitting to describe it as an exhaustively detailed chronicle of an endeavour as complicated and contradictory in its planning as it was audacious and astounding in its (on-going) execution

so cemented is the Carl Sagan-ized version of the story in public consciousness that, as Eberle demonstrates, it’s easy to forget that when the mission was first conceived, a human-launched object had only just made it as far as Mars: the Mariner 4 flyby in 1965

in fact, for VGR77-2, VGR77-3 (the ‘real’ names of Voyager 1 and Voyager 2) and VGR77-1 (the baby sister that stayed at home at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory), the narrative of a solar-system conquering, intergalactic ambassador of human achievement came later. against the socio-political context of 1970s America it took some convincing to get the project off the ground

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designs of the year

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London’s Design Museum have revealed this year’s contenders for their annual Designs of the Year exhibition, opening next month. here are our top science(ish) picks…

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profile: Tim Stoelting

Tim Stoelting in his studio

working at the busy intersection of art, design and narrative, artist Tim Stoelting explores concepts and materials by creating art ‘systems’ – rich playgrounds for ideas in which to work. one such project sees the 27-year-old Winsconsonite acting as NASA’s artist-in-residence: a programme long since cancelled by a sceptical US Congress

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laserlight

© STFC

the light from a single pulse of the world’s most powerful laser is intense enough to heat material to millions of degrees in less than a trillionth of a second. extreme electric fields wrapped up in the laser pulse pull matter into its constituent negative and positive charged parts, forming the 4th state of matter: plasma

behind the beauty of the burning glow of laser plasma lies a wealth of extraordinary and extreme physics. researchers at the STFC‘s Central Laser Facility outside Oxford are studying this exotic state of matter because it can host a tiny, micro-particle accelerator that gives off beams of X-rays and particles that can be used in medical, manufacturing and security imaging

studying laser plasma may also help us replicate the fusion reactions that power the sun. used here on Earth, this could provide a limitless source of clean, green energy

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call for entries: International Images For Science

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calling all photographers: the Royal Photographic Society is looking for entries for a new exhibition exploring all branches of science – from medicine and forensic science to zoology, engineering and astronomy. the society will select 100 images to form a touring exhibition launching at the British Science Festival in Bradford, September 2015 – representing the variety of ways photography is applied to science. find more information and apply here


extinct

James Bridle

assembled by artist Gustav Metzger and curators Julia Peyton-Jones and Hans-Ulrich Obrist, this year’s Serpentine Marathon will see dozens of leading artists, writers, scientists, musicians and intellectual types pondering the theme of extinction over the course of eighteen furious hours. science-y highlights for us science-y types range from talks by folks like UCL’s Professor Georgina Mace – who asks “Are We in the Midst of a Mass Extinction?” – and Astronomer Royal Martin Rees expanding on his book Our Final Century? to more art/science stuff like sonic de-extinction specialist Marguerite Humeau’s recreation of Cleopatra’s voice and artist Trevor Paglen – whose incredible work The Last Pictures is currently in geostationary orbit aboard an EchoStar communications satellite. throw in appearances by Whole Earth Catalog founder Stewart Brand, sound recording legend Chris Watson and eco-conscious model Lily Cole and it becomes a no-brainer: if you go to one nerd rave this year, make it this one


airship

HAV-3

based on a former US military project, the HAV-3 is a massive, 91m long next-generation airship which uses a combination of aerodynamic lift and helium to stay aloft. following the cancellation of the programme, the UK company involved bought the prototype and are now working to make the craft – now renamed the Airlander – viable as form of sustainable future transport. audiences in London can hear more about the project at a free lecture tonight at the Royal Aeronautical Society


guest post: Edgar Martins

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in this exclusive post, photographer Edgar Martins selects his favourite images from, and writes about the inspiration behind, his vast photographic documentary project, which captures the craft, materials and facilities behind the European Space Agency

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