..

Planetoid Life by Seana Gavin

PlanetoidLife

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

£50
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

read more


Time Traveller by Seana Gavin

TimeTraveller

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

full series here

£50
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

read more


Liberty Sunset by Seana Gavin

LibertySunset

34x34cm glicée print
limited edition of 50

our collaborative collage series with artist Seana Gavin is inspired by our mutual love of vintage science books, world encyclopaedias and other educational treasures. combing the super/collider library for inspiration, Gavin’s meticulous hand-made collages reposition and reinvent Earth and space-based objects as new forms in surreal, otherworldly landscapes – strange realms devoid of a fixed time and place

£50
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

read more


ten

104-page retrospective book (2006-2016)
first edition of 1000
170mm x 240mm
printed with vegetable-based inks on FSC-certified paper made from 100% post-consumer waste

in 2006 we published our first fanzine and began a journey into science and culture. from the depths of interstellar space to the limitless subatomic horizons of particle physics to the most beautiful places on our planet, we’ve been privileged to spend the past decade exploring the wonders and aesthetics of science from a creative standpoint

full of short stories and facts, ten is more than just a retrospective of our work. it’s a visual record of where science has taken us all in the last decade – told through 100 beautiful images from the worlds of astronomy, chemistry, mineralogy, physics, ecology, biology… and beyond

£10
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

read more


ring world

manicouagan_crater_iss012e15880

open up Google Maps and scroll over to Canada – then zoom in and take a look to the right of the ‘Québec’ label. notice something weird? a massive, circular lake? that’s an impact crater from a 5km wide comet or asteroid that hit the area over 200 million years ago, making it the oldest known and largest visible impact crater on Earth

in our new column for AnOther, we look at Manicouagan Crater and other (potentially related) impact sites across the planet


making plastic precious

Studio Swine

inspired by nautical craftsmanship and folk art, the designers at Studio Swine went in search of plastic in the ocean for their Gyrecraft project – and found a lot to choose from. sailing 1000 nautical miles from the Azores to the Canary Islands, they passed through through the North Atlantic Gyre: one of five points on the planet where swirling megacurrents concentrate vast quantities of floating debris, including plastic

“it’s one of the biggest problems facing our civilisation,” says Studio Swine’s Alex Groves, “plastic is in every part of the ocean and the effect it’s having on plankton is only just beginning to be investigated. plankton are the base of the entire planet’s food chain, and they are responsible for producing one third of the oxygen we breath. if we lose plankton we are headed for another mass extinction. in the swirling gyre, most of the plastics have broken down into tiny fragments which are spread over massive stretches of the ocean. due to their size, they are incredibly difficult to recover in any large quantity – making this once disposable material very precious”

read more


saved 🌴

Corinne Staley

good news on the rainforest front this month, with the Democratic Republic of Congo declaring a vast new national park covering 2.2 million acres of virtually pristine forest that’s home to Bonobos, Okapis, Forest Elephants, Congo Peacocks and a newly discovered monkey, the Lesula

now, alongside the new Lomami National Park, the Rainforest Trust and local partner the Lukuru Wildlife Research Foundation are looking to safeguard another 1.1 million acres next door by establishing the Balanga Forest Reserve. together, this will form a massive joined up area to help stabilise the region for people and wildlife, safeguard the forest and promote sustainable livelihoods

super/collider firmly believes that protecting pristine rainforests like those found in the Congo is one of the most effective strategies for protecting biodiversity and mitigating climate change. we will be making a donation and invite you to join us – with an anonymous benefactor matching donations, your donation of just £15 can save 50 acres!

donate now


2016 Icelandic expedition

photo by Tom Sewell

7-12 September 2016

as late summer lingers over the North Atlantic, join a small group of like-minded creative explorers as we travel across, around and underneath Iceland in search of the Northern Lights and other natural wonders in our most ambitious Icelandic adventure to date

amid the stark beauty of the country’s surreal landscapes, we’ll spend the dark nights watching for the Aurora Borealis and the days exploring the country’s geological, volcanic and natural diversity. we’ll hike to towering glaciers, visit slumbering volcanoes, watch erupting geysers, relax in natural hot springs, venture behind tumbling waterfalls and descend under the surface of Iceland’s constantly shifting topography

join the waiting list

read more


species of the week

sponge

marine biologists announced the discovery this week of what could be among the oldest living organisms on Earth. a massive sea sponge about ‘the size of a minivan’ was photographed last summer over 2km down in the depths of the Papahānaumokuākea marine reserve – a massive protected area the size of Germany located northwest of Hawaii. although not dated yet, it’s the largest specimen yet found. similar, smaller sponges in shallow waters can be over 2000 years old, making this slow-growing deep sea discovery a potential contender


brewing up a storm

Kiritimati-EO

Wednesday 8 June 2016

join Professor Joanna Haigh from Imperial College London and super/collider for an evening exploring our planet’s changing climate

come make your own cyanotype print of a Pacific island at threat from sea level rise before settling down to hear Joanna discuss why our climate is changing and how physics can help to predict our planet’s future. Brewing up a Storm is part of the Institute of Physics Summer Sessions and is open to all – no physics knowledge is necessary

drinks and snacks are available at the talk and attendance is free – just make sure to register beforehand

6-8pm
canalside steps, Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA
free | book here


the plant whisperer

20796560424_bc0eea277b_o-640x460

Wednesday 4 May 2016

join super/collider at Second Home to gain an insight into artist Kasia Molga‘s practice, which encourages plants to draw. as part of the World Wilder Lab project, Kasia and her colleagues have been interacting with plants using hacking techniques. the multi-media artist describes herself as an environmentalist, hactivist and designer concerned with changes in our relationship with ecology in an increasingly technologically mediated world

7.30-9.30pm
Second Home
68 Hanbury Street / London / E1 5JL
£5 / book now

 


living photographs

www.alice.cazenave.co.uk

Wednesday 6 April 2016

join super/collider at Second Home for a discussion between artist Alice Cazenave, materials maestro Seetal Solanki, microbiologist Dr. Simon Park and artist Melanie King about light sensitive materials in the natural world, techniques for printing on leaves and bacteria which responds to light

7.30-9.30pm
Second Home
68 Hanbury Street / London / E1 5JL
£5 / book now

read more


exploring the invisible

SP

Wednesday 2 March 2016

bioluminescent bacteria are the most widely distributed light-emitting organisms on Earth. experienced up close, bioluminescence is a powerful and refined light: cold but beguiling. in his practice, Dr Simon Park has used bacterial bioluminescence beyond rigorous scientific research and in this talk will explore his long-standing investigation into the aesthetics of bacterial bioluminescence and how he has used this organic form of light as a unique medium to disclose some of nature’s most vital yet often unseen events

7.30-9.30pm
Second Home
68 Hanbury Street, London E1 5JL
free but RSVP required

read more


blue flowers

BP_colourchanging_lily

just in time for Valentine’s Day, our pals at Bompas & Parr have only gone and created the world’s first colour changing flowers. hand painted with a thermochromatic ink, the roses, anemones, lilies and orchids shimmer as you (and/or your lover) exhale on them due to fluctuations in temperature. the flowers come in two forms: one is based on a liquid crystal dye process that changes at 27°C from a deep satin black to Champagne bottle green, “exhibiting all the hues regularly seen on the backs of beetles”. the second uses a black thermochromatic dye that transforms at 31°C. the flower is then spritzed a crystal elixir and ignited – revealing the various pigments in the heat of the flame

you can take a closer look at these wonders of botanical chemistry today and all this weekend in a series of hands-on workshops at the Edition Hotel in London


profile: Katie Paterson

100 Billion Suns by Katie Paterson

Tate Modern and the Institute of Physics recently got together to curate a series of events entitled Light and Dark Matters, which saw leading artists and scientists, philosophers and theorists debating our contemporary experience of light, darkness and dark matter

at the event, we caught up with Katie Paterson, a Berlin-based visual artist working at the intersection of art and science. Katie was part of the discussion “Are we darkened by light?” – which examined the effects of light pollution on our experience of the night sky

read more


species of the week: 紅脖游蛇

© Robert Ferguson

fittingly on the day that sees our first event in Hong Kong, our species this week is 紅脖游蛇 – aka the red-necked keelback snake, or Rhabdophis subminiatus. as Robert Ferguson, the photographer who took this picture, explains: the red-necked keelback unique in that it’s the only animal that is both venomous (with a deadly bite) and poisonous (as it can secrete the poison from toads that it eats via a groove in its neck. despite this, the species is essentially harmless as it very rarely bites and is not at all aggressive


15 photos that show nature recolonising Chernobyl 🌿

a new study from researchers at the University of Portsmouth shows that wildlife is alive and well in the abandoned areas around Chernobyl, scene of the catastrophic nuclear meltdown in 1986 that left the landscape largely uninhabitable for humans

“There is continuing scientific and public debate surrounding the fate of wildlife that remained in the abandoned area,” explain the study’s authors. “Our long-term empirical data showed no evidence of a negative influence of radiation on mammal abundance. Relative abundances of elk, roe deer, red deer and wild boar within the Chernobyl exclusion zone are similar to those in four (uncontaminated) nature reserves in the region and wolf abundance is more than 7 times higher. These results demonstrate for the first time that, regardless of potential radiation effects on individual animals, the Chernobyl exclusion zone supports an abundant mammal community after nearly three decades of chronic radiation exposures”

when we traveled to the region in 2011 with Unknown Fields, we were struck by just how abundant nature is in former towns like Prypiat, where most of these photos were taken

read more


everyday aliens

slime mould

Sunday 30 August 2015

slime moulds are intelligent lifeforms which have intrigued scientists across the world with their impressive capacity to make decisions, solve problems and learn from their environment. join super/collider and artist Heather Barnett on board The Floating Cinema for a slime mould workshop and screening of the documentary The Creeping Garden. in this special workshop and screening, you’ll get the opportunity to explore the mysterious behaviour of these beautiful brainless blobs firsthand – and take home an unusual pet

workshop booking
film screening booking

read more


guest post: Planet Labs

Mojave solar plant

in the second in a series of guest posts, the people over at Planet Labs share their favourite images of the Earth from above. fittingly for the week that saw a massive announcement on US emissions, this image shows the Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System in the Mojave Desert of California. instead of using solar cells to directly convert sunlight into electricity, it uses thousands of mirrors to focus sunlight onto a boiler 459 feet above the desert floor. the resulting superheated steam drives conventional turbines to create electricity

read more


sample of the week: quartz arenite

Cerro Sarisariñama

quartz arenites are the most ancient exposed sedimentary rocks on earth. a type of sandstone, they’re incredibly hard, and form the basis of South America’s incredible ‘tepui’ mountains – vast flat-topped table formations that rise above the forests and clouds of the northern Amazon. over the eons the relentless action of water has hollowed out four giant sinkholes on the Cerro Sarisariñama plateau in Venezuela. measuring more than 350m across and 300m deep, these circular voids in the forest contain their own miniature jungles – tiny worlds within worlds

read more about Cerro Sarisariñama in our latest column for AnOther


.