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ten

104-page retrospective book (2006-2016)
first edition of 1000
170mm x 240mm
printed with vegetable-based inks on FSC-certified paper made from 100% post-consumer waste

in 2006 we published our first fanzine and began a journey into science and culture. from the depths of interstellar space to the limitless subatomic horizons of particle physics to the most beautiful places on our planet, we’ve been privileged to spend the past decade exploring the wonders and aesthetics of science from a creative standpoint

full of short stories and facts, ten is more than just a retrospective of our work. it’s a visual record of where science has taken us all in the last decade – told through 100 beautiful images from the worlds of astronomy, chemistry, mineralogy, physics, ecology, biology… and beyond

£10
add to cart (UK)
add to cart (elsewhere)

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the in sound from way out

GOES satellite

researchers at Queen Mary University in London are inviting filmmakers and creatives to experiment with sounds from space, as part of a new competition launched today. to find out more about these cosmic noises, we caught up with project lead Dr Martin Archer…

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2016 Icelandic expedition

photo by Tom Sewell

7-12 September 2016

as late summer lingers over the North Atlantic, join a small group of like-minded creative explorers as we travel across, around and underneath Iceland in search of the Northern Lights and other natural wonders in our most ambitious Icelandic adventure to date

amid the stark beauty of the country’s surreal landscapes, we’ll spend the dark nights watching for the Aurora Borealis and the days exploring the country’s geological, volcanic and natural diversity. we’ll hike to towering glaciers, visit slumbering volcanoes, watch erupting geysers, relax in natural hot springs, venture behind tumbling waterfalls and descend under the surface of Iceland’s constantly shifting topography

join the waiting list

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brewing up a storm

Kiritimati-EO

Wednesday 8 June 2016

join Professor Joanna Haigh from Imperial College London and super/collider for an evening exploring our planet’s changing climate

come make your own cyanotype print of a Pacific island at threat from sea level rise before settling down to hear Joanna discuss why our climate is changing and how physics can help to predict our planet’s future. Brewing up a Storm is part of the Institute of Physics Summer Sessions and is open to all – no physics knowledge is necessary

drinks and snacks are available at the talk and attendance is free – just make sure to register beforehand

6-8pm
canalside steps, Granary Square, King’s Cross, London, N1C 4AA
free | book here


designs of the year

Miito_Front_2

London’s Design Museum have revealed this year’s contenders for their annual Designs of the Year exhibition, opening next month. here are our top science(ish) picks…

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Laser Quest party pics

Photo by Amelia Karlsen

super/collider kicked off 2015 with a massively sold out celebration of lasers at the Ace Hotel, packing in three top laser plasma physicists, psychedelic tea from Bompas & Parr and music from To The Lazer Cave. photographers Amelia Karlsen and John Hooper captured all the action from our most epic-est night yet. take a look or head over to our Facebook to tag your friends, like yourself etc

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Laser Quest

laser quest

Thursday 8 January 2015

join super/collider and friends for an epic night of laser action, as we kick off the International Year of Light with the best kind of light: that of lasers! a celebration of lasers in all their glory, the evening will begin with a Laser Tea Ceremony by Bompas & Parr and end with a full audio-visual laser onslaught from cult promoters and DJs To The Lazer Cave

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the nuclear sublime

Screen Shot 2015-02-03 at 16.29.44

super/collider’s newest contributor, Melanie King, catches up with art historian and curator John O’Brian, who is currently exhibiting part of his vast personal archive of nuclear photographs at WORK Gallery, London

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laserlight

© STFC

the light from a single pulse of the world’s most powerful laser is intense enough to heat material to millions of degrees in less than a trillionth of a second. extreme electric fields wrapped up in the laser pulse pull matter into its constituent negative and positive charged parts, forming the 4th state of matter: plasma

behind the beauty of the burning glow of laser plasma lies a wealth of extraordinary and extreme physics. researchers at the STFC‘s Central Laser Facility outside Oxford are studying this exotic state of matter because it can host a tiny, micro-particle accelerator that gives off beams of X-rays and particles that can be used in medical, manufacturing and security imaging

studying laser plasma may also help us replicate the fusion reactions that power the sun. used here on Earth, this could provide a limitless source of clean, green energy

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call for entries: International Images For Science

blaschka jellyfish

calling all photographers: the Royal Photographic Society is looking for entries for a new exhibition exploring all branches of science – from medicine and forensic science to zoology, engineering and astronomy. the society will select 100 images to form a touring exhibition launching at the British Science Festival in Bradford, September 2015 – representing the variety of ways photography is applied to science. find more information and apply here


extinct

James Bridle

assembled by artist Gustav Metzger and curators Julia Peyton-Jones and Hans-Ulrich Obrist, this year’s Serpentine Marathon will see dozens of leading artists, writers, scientists, musicians and intellectual types pondering the theme of extinction over the course of eighteen furious hours. science-y highlights for us science-y types range from talks by folks like UCL’s Professor Georgina Mace – who asks “Are We in the Midst of a Mass Extinction?” – and Astronomer Royal Martin Rees expanding on his book Our Final Century? to more art/science stuff like sonic de-extinction specialist Marguerite Humeau’s recreation of Cleopatra’s voice and artist Trevor Paglen – whose incredible work The Last Pictures is currently in geostationary orbit aboard an EchoStar communications satellite. throw in appearances by Whole Earth Catalog founder Stewart Brand, sound recording legend Chris Watson and eco-conscious model Lily Cole and it becomes a no-brainer: if you go to one nerd rave this year, make it this one


2O12 in 12 seconds

from the Transit of Venus, laser fusion and Himalayan glaciers to jellyfish, crystals and hypergiant stars, here are some of the images we transmitted via our weekly email this year, along with a few from the cutting room floor. we hope you’ve enjoyed – have a lovely holiday and we’ll meet you back here for more visual science in 2013
♡ s/c


science printing workshop

23 October 2012

as part of the ün-establishment series we’ll be bringing our new Risograph printer down to the Nicholls & Clarke building in Shoreditch for a Tuesday afternoon of science, art & craft. join our expert teachers Nancy Straughan and Ciara Phelan and learn how to create patterns, prints, collages and illustrated work using science textbooks and imagery as inspiration – then create your own on-the-spot prints


science weekend at KXFS

August 2012

a weekend of science-leaning events at the King’s Cross Filling Station, a stunning new public space and pop-up restaurant on the Regent’s Canal read more


plumes

delicate and highly detailed studies of the flora and fauna of the Pacific islands provide the inspiration for Carlos Noronha Feio’s latest work, now showing at IMT Gallery.  Plant Life of the Pacific World  is a series of gracefully collaged photos of nuclear explosions, alluringly echoing the forms of the natural world as classified by American botanist E.D. Merrill’s book from which the exhibition takes its name. the book’s dry classification of plant forms is transformed by Noronha Feio into an explosive revelry of intense, amoebic forms bursting forth as deadly chain reactions


Science Fair™ – Can Thorium Save the World?

22 February 2012

Science Fair™ returns for a new school year with an evening dedicated to one of the great ‘what ifs’ of the modern world. back in the 1960s, a promising type of safer, cleaner nuclear reactors emerged – powered by an abundant element called thorium. could such designs have prevented climate change and reduced nuclear proliferation, and could this new breed of reactors still save the world? join super/collider and guests from the Weinberg Foundation as we explore the latest breakthroughs and screen the recent Motherboard documentary, The Thorium Dream


star power

in the middle of the night, as the rest of America sleeps, a small group of physicists in California stand in a hushed control room. the clock steadily counts down towards zero and then, in a fraction of a second, everything happens at once

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if

on Friday and Saturday, we’ll be covering a new Intelligence² conference dedicated to all things futuristic – from extreme architecture and endless cities to longevity research and life in outer space. alongside the usual more tech- and business-oriented stuff, the iq² If Conference has packed in a lot of science, including Hugh Broughton Architects’ spacecraft-like pods for the British Antarctic Survey read more


solar

experts from academia and industry are gathering today and tomorrow at the Royal Society in London to discuss the latest innovations in solar power and ask the stark question of whether this clean, green power source can really deliver read more


renewables

following on from his Light After Dark series, which captured softly-glowing coal stations running through the night, photographer Toby Smith has turned his lens on renewable energy infrastructure – starting with hydroelectric facilities like the 305MW Foyers plant shown here. now on show at The Print Space in London, Toby hopes to continue and expand The Renewables Project to cover other forms of cleaner power and the strange places and machines that make it possible

 

_Foyers Turbine Shaft by Toby Smith


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